One of the biggest challenges both parents and DJs share is trying to get all the children to have fun together as early as possible into the event. Making friends in social events is an important part of a child’s development. It also gives the parents less work in needing to babysit their children whilst they try to network with the rest of the adults in the room. When you book with SIFA Events you are safely assured that we have the best expertise. These are the three key pointers a SIFA Events DJ is trained in doing: 

What do children party DJs do?

The children party DJ is experienced in interpreting the child’s active and passive movements. Great interpretation skills are assessed and refreshed with the SIFA Events Academy. Because the DJ is able to wisely interpret a child’s active and passive movements, the SIFA Events DJ can adjust song remixes to help bond children together over a song or have them cooperative to break away for meals.

How does a children’s party DJ differ from the novice DJ?

A SIFA Events DJ knows that they are not only performing for the children. Parents need to also be considered when giving the entertainment experience. A SIFA Events DJ will know that there is a special algorithm for ensuring that not only do children mix and separate at the right time, but also their parents and organisers. You would not need to tell a good DJ to add in songs which appeal to bringing parents closer to other parents and connecting the parents with their children. Children in partisan also enjoy the event more when they see their parents having fun with them and other parents on the dance floor.

When should you get a DJ to transition into new songs?

Parents should get their DJ to transition into every new song. You will know your DJ is transitioning correctly by hearing the slow lead up into a new song. Slow lead ups help children especially remain consistently engaged with mingling with other children and comfortable when they need to part ways (i.e. going for a meal). Repercussions of when a DJ breaks up songs with a separate sound altogether (i.e. swooshing) subconsciously frightens a child which leads to unsteadiness, sometimes even anxiety. If you have children you might have noticed a similar unsteadiness when they have technology instantly turned off or their sibling goes from being happy to frustrate at them. This is very much the same being in the social surrounding of an event.

These three pointers above can really help every parent safeguard the friendliness of their event. Most of all DJs who have not gone through our SIFA Academy course would not know this. Especially the novice DJs. As parents, we do our best to make a memory their children will remember when they grow into adulthood. Stipulated inside the Australian Institute of Family Studies, taking good care in making a memory memorable reduces the everyday social exclusion children experience. Social exclusion is least susceptible when a child is having a unique experience. That’s why you are able to recall only the novel moments you have. Each one is unique and the best ones are ones you can easily relate to.

Why do novel moments help children make friends?

Friendships begin with a novel moment. If you can recall back to the times when an individual would ask how you and your friend know each other, then you would go into a story about an experience which led the both of you to connect. Novel moments that are created with the help of a parent or friend would, in fact, solidify an energy of intersection; meaning that for some, you struggle to end a friendship because of something or other (i.e. they were there when I saw up an adults skirt for the first time or they were there for me to meet so and so). Novel moments substantiate friendship formations for children.

Where and who can set up these sort of novel moments?

Adults and older children can set up novel moments. Events don’t have to be boring or vanilla; and as you age you understand very well the challenges of making friends and avoiding exclusion. With these two factors of age and interest, it can be surprisingly easy to help connect children together at an event.